August 10th, 2008

Sprint Car A-Main
1. 7d Dave Darland
2. 10e Scotty Weir
3. 29w Cole Whitt
4. 71a Caleb Armstrong
5. 5k Alex Schutte
6. 7p Anthony Peterman
7. 66j Josh Spencer
8. 8h Lance Hayden
9. 44 Ryan Pace
10. 5 Jon Stanbrough
11. 35 Sammy Imel
12. 1c Kent Christian
13. 71p Billy Puterbaugh
14. 10f Blake Fitzpatrick
15. 41k Henry Clarke
16. 4x Dylan Burge
17. 66s Corey Smith
18. 54 Matt Westfall
19. 11s Hunter Schuerenberg
20. 17b Brett Burdette

Sprint Car B-Main
1. 35 Imel (TR)
2. 66j Spencer (TR)
3. 71a Armstrong (TR)
4. 1c Christian (TR)
5. 8h Hayden (TR)
6. 2 Cameron McGahan
7. 11r Tyler Reddick
8. 59p Bob Bourff
DNS 96 Larry Bontrager
DNS 78 Adam Byrkett
DNS 77 Dustin Smith

Street Stock A-Main
1. 1 Jimmy Nutter
2. 8 David Hurst
3. 11h Ryan Hines
4. 9g Glen Gamblin
5. 18m Andre Missig
6. 84 Thurman Wines
7. 17 Tristan Ramseyer
8. 9w Greg Pitts
9. 89b Bobby Burton
10. 2 Bob Jarrett
11. 48 Arnie Prater
12. 62 David Jarvis
13. 19 Josh Gamblin
14. 2m George Meacham
15. h0 Lee Hobbs

Thunder Car A-Main
1. 56 Tony Bowman
2. 26 Jason Larrison
3. 0c Chris Clark
4. 2h Tim Huffman
5. 7d Allen Davis
6. 215 Gerald Armfield
7. 5j Jim Summitt
8. 88 Jeremy Koon
9. 83 Ray Molder
10. 92 Scott Apple
11. 12c Steve Clark
12. 38a John Antoine
13. 85 Warrell Law
14. 92z Chanteal Zimmerman
15. L215 Paul Whittaker
16. 33 Jeff Shaw
17. 75 Marvin Uitts
18. 28d David Atkins
19. 901 Junior Williams
20. 2w James White
21. 19 Rick Paul
DNS 19x Jerrad Jackson

USAC Midgets A-Main
1. Bryan Clauson
2. Tracy Hines
3. Jerry Coons Jr.
4. Cole Whitt
5. Levi Jones
6. Bobby East
7. Brad Loyet
8. Steve Buckwalter
9. Darren Hagen
10. Chris Windom
11. Brad Kuhn
12. Danny Stratton
13. Josh Ford
14. Shane Cottle
15. Garrett Hansen
16. Ricky Ehrgott
17. Brady Bacon
18. Dustin Morgan
19. Brad Sweet
20. Chad Boat
21. Davey Ray
22. Robert Ballou
23. Zach Daum
24. Dave Darland

USAC Midget B-Main
1. Boat
2. Ray
3. Windom
4. East
5. Stratton
6. Ballou
7. Kuhn
8. Carter
9. Westfall
10. Gehrke
11. Wanless
12. Jordan
13. Boyles
14. Liguori
15. Conover
16. Norris
17. Swanson
18. A.Galedrige
19. Darland
20. Armstrong

Clauson, Darland weather storms for wins

By Derek Fisher

Kokomo Speedway: Where amazing happens.
In the second midget/sprint car double-dip of the 2008 season at the 61-year-old facility, Bryan Clauson and Dave Darland were victorious on a night that could only be described as wild. Very wild.

Midgets
On July 18, 2004, a very young Bryan Clauson claimed his second career sprint car victory on the old Kokomo Speedway configuration aboard an Armstrong Farms-owned machine. Now fast forward four years and 23 days; a still-young Clauson captured his first career USAC dirt win at the new Kokomo Speedway, and this time the victory was taken in a mount all his own.

Clauson, driving the Cory Tucker/Bryan Clauson Racing No. 47 midget, withstood an early challenge from Brad Sweet and a late surge by Jerry Coons, Jr. to win the final leg of the fourth annual Indiana Midget Week.

The pole-sitting Clauson led the initial lap before Sweet, who started in the fourth position, made his presence known to the leader in a big way. Departing from his usual high-wire act, Sweet surged low off the second corner on lap two and stayed on the moist bottom coming off turn four to take the point from Clauson.

Sweet held his low-side advantage for the next three laps while Clauson steadily gained momentum in the high groove. The two’s paths crossed at the flagstand on lap six when the Grass Valley, Calif. native again shot off the bottom, banging wheels with a flat-out Clauson and losing the lead by a matter of inches at the stripe.

Seemingly energized by the contact, Clauson stretched out a bit of a lead over Sweet as Chad Boat, Davey Ray and fast-qualifier Brady Bacon quarreled behind the leaders with 10 laps in the books.

Lap 11 saw the first stoppage of the event, and also the first casualty of a treacherous turn one cushion when Robert Ballou tumbled hard after bicycling on the growing ledge. Ballou was not hurt, but his ride was finished for the evening.

On the restart Clauson maintained his advantage over Sweet and Boat while Cole Whitt was a fast-mover, up to fourth from his third row starting spot with seventh-place starter Darren Hagen in tow. The action lasted only until lap 14 however, when Boat flipped out of third by mirroring Ballou’s misfortune on the first turn curb.

With Boat unhurt the action resumed with Whitt in third and Hagen falling into the sights of a surging fifth-place Tracy Hines. Just two more laps were completed though, before turn one claimed two more victims: Sweet and Hagen. Sweet lost the bead on his right rear tire in the heavy stuff and spun to a stop, collecting Hagen in the process.

With those two out of the running, Hines was the new runner-up as the New Castle driver had worked past Whitt early on lap 16. As Clauson again eased out to a sizeable lead, Hines and Whitt settled in behind him while Levi Jones, Bobby East and Coons waged a war for fourth. Coons, who’d started 19th, shot under both Jones and East on lap 21′s backstretch, claiming the fourth spot and setting his sights on Whitt in one turn of the wheel.

After another stoppage, this one for Garrett Hansen’s tipover in — you guessed it — turn one, Coons did away with Whitt on lap 24 and Hines on lap 26. Nearly pulling even with Clauson by diving low into the first turn and riding high in turns three and four, Coons looked to be a lock to overtake the leader before bogging down his Speedway Motors mount in the second corner with just two laps remaining. That misstep allowed Clauson to win going away and resulted in Coons losing spots to Hines and Whitt. The Phoenix, Ariz. driver was able to re-pass Whitt to claim third.

“This means quite a bit,” Clauson said after the 30-lap main event. “This is my first USAC dirt win, and I’ve been trying to get one forever. Me and Brad had a good race early, and after that I was just cruising and trying not to make mistakes. When I saw Jerry poke his nose under me there on the last couple laps, I knew I had to get back up on the ledge.”

Jones followed Clauson, Hines, Coons and Whitt in fifth.

Sprints
After winning sprint car features on the Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday nights leading up to Sunday’s program, it was apparent that Dave Darland was on a roll. The popular driver was apparently hotter than anyone knew, however: He arrived at the Kokomo sprint undercard late after an earlier race in Iowa, started on the tail of the A feature and promptly won it. Roll indeed.

Darland’s second win of 2008 at Kokomo was certainly improbable given his starting position, yet there were undoubtedly fans in the house who didn’t count him out; those same fans had seen Jon Stanbrough win from the tail here in 2007 and Hunter Schuerenberg do the same just two weeks ago.

Scotty Weir, in an Edison Motorsports backup car after a big Gas City tumble on Friday night, led lap one from his front row starting position with Billy Puterbaugh, Stanbrough and Blake Fitzpatrick in tow.

Like the midget main, the sprint car finale was marred with incidents and the first occured with just that first lap in the books; Whitt and Schuerenberg collided in turn two of lap two, collecting Brett Burdette in the process and ending the latter and Schuerenberg’s night. Whitt suffered only cosmetic damage and reported to the tail, where he trailed Darland.

Matt Westfall brought out another caution before a lap could be completed on the restart when he stumbled over the cushion in turn one, hitting the wall and coming to a stop. Westfall did not turn over like so many of his midget brethren, but his car was too damaged to continue.

Upon resumption of racing action, Weir paced the same top four plus a very game Anthony Peterman in fifth. Stanbrough pulled alongside the leader at the completion of lap four, and using his patented lunge out of turn two, snagged the lead away from Weir the next time by. Not to be outdone, Weir returned the pass on the high side out of turn four on the next lap and led the next four circuits with Stanbrough hot on his heels.

As the top two got gone from everyone else, Fitzpatrick had moved around Puterbaugh and into third, while Sammy Imel had displaced Peterman for fifth and Puterbaugh for fourth by lap nine. At the same instant, Stanbrough was finding a rhythym in his middle groove and the Avon shoe was able to squeeze under Weir on the frontstretch to retake the lead on lap 10.

With Stanbrough pulling away, Darland’s charge was beginning to pay dividends. Shown in sixth after getting around Puterbaugh on lap 11, Darland, Imel and Peterman were too close to call for fourth at the line on lap 12. Utilizing his favored high line, “Deputy Dave” sat all alone in fourth the next time by.

With Darland coming on quickly, Fitzpatrick did the veteran a favor by spinning out of a competitive third place all by himself in the turn one shelf on lap 14. With nowhere to go, Puterbaugh slammed into the West Terre Haute driver’s mount, ending Fitzpatrick’s night and sending Puterbaugh to the tail.

As the field restarted with 16 laps left to go, Darland wasted little time in tracking down Weir. He passed the Marion pilot for second on lap 18, just after Whitt had also reintroduced himself to the fight. Battling for fifth with Imel and Ryan Pace on lap 16, Whitt first did away with Imel before putting Pace away on lap 19.

After Darland made an uncharacteristic bobble on lap 20′s turn four, Weir had a brief reprieve and grabbed second once more. Regaining his mometnum, Darland caught up with Weir just as the Edison pilot was putting a move on Stanbrough, and the top three flashed under the flagstand nearly dead even to complete lap 21. It took only until the first corner before things got really interesting: With Darland leading Weir ever so slightly up high, Stanbrough pitched his Baldwin Bros. sprinter low into turn one and looped the car untouched, stalling it in the process. Mechanical woes may have been to blame for the spin, as Stanbrough retired to the pits for the night.

As if there hadn’t been enough action yet, there was more to come on the ensuing restart. Kent Christian, who was running in the seventh position, rode over a wheel at the entrance to turn one and executed a violent series of snap rolls before bouncing off the fence and eventually landing upright in the middle of the corner. Though shaken, Christian was unhurt. Imel was also caught up in the incident, and front end damage ended his race.

With just 10 cars left on the track and Darland clinging to his newly-found lead, the race was again stopped on lap 23 when Ryan Pace became the last competitor of the evening to test turn one concrete, severely damaging his mount in the process.

Just a two-lap shootout remained once the green waved again, and Weir looked low to take one last shot at Darland. It nearly worked when Weir clawed under the leader as the white flag waved, but the familiar No. 10e sprint car ran dry of fuel on the last circuit, and Weir was only able to keep his race alive by leaning out his fuel mixture drastically. That paved the way for Darland to take the checkers unhindered, and he was followed by Weir, Whitt, Caleb Armstrong, Alex Schutte, Peterman and Josh Spencer.

In Kokomo street stock action, Jim Nutter picked up a hard-fought A feature win over David Hurst.

Starting outside the second row, Nutter settled into fourth place early as Thurman Wines and Hurst dueled at the front of the pack. As Hurst moved around Wines to take the point on lap five, Nutter was on the move as well, surging past Glen Gamblin and Tristan Ramseyer. Nutter circled Wines on the following circuit to nab second, and the lead duo began to distance itself from the rest of the field.

As Nutter pressed Hurst lap after lap, Gamblin and Arnie Prater had their own battle going for the third spot. First testing Gamblin on lap 13, Prater found a way around the Kokomo veteran on the 14th circuit. Meanwhile, Ryan Hines was on a tear to the front after starting 12th. The Kokomo driver passed Wines for fifth on lap 14, and began gaining on the fourth-place Gamblin immediately.

By lap 15 Nutter had drawn up to the rear bumper of Hurst, and nearly found the lead at the line. The next time around, Nutter was indeed the leader after passing for the top spot on the high side. Hurst remained within shouting distance, however, as the 20-lap event drew to a close.

With just one lap remaining, the two-battle theme resumed as Hurst mounted one last charge at the lead with the help of lapped traffic; at the same time, Hines was hounding Gamblin for the show position. After briefly losing the lead to Hurst on the final lap’s backstretch, Nutter found enough speed on the high side to nip Hurst at the stripe for the win.

Hines was able to circle Gamblin on the final circuit to take third in front of Gamblin, Andre Missig, Wines, Ramseyer and Greg Pitts.

In the thunder car A-main, Tony Bowman continued his dominance of the division by recording his sixth consecutive victory.

Starting from outside the third row, Bowman shot into third place on the opening circuit behind Jeff Shaw and Jason Larrison. By lap two Bowman was already in front, having used a backstretch maneuver to get around the leaders.

From there it was all Bowman, all the time. Stretching out his lead to nearly a straightaway at times, Bowman was the class of the field yet again. Behind him, Larrison overtook the second spot when Shaw dropped from contention on lap nine, and Chris Clark vaulted into the third position despite a malfunctioning hood.

Late in the event, Tim Huffman passed Allen Davis to snare the fourth spot, a position he would not give up. Larrison placed second and was followed by Clark, Huffman, Davis and Gerald Armfield.

In Kokomo street stock action, Jim Nutter picked up a hard-fought A feature win over David Hurst.

Starting outside the second row, Nutter settled into fourth place early as Thurman Wines and Hurst dueled at the front of the pack. As Hurst moved around Wines to take the point on lap five, Nutter was on the move as well, surging past Glen Gamblin and Tristan Ramseyer. Nutter circled Wines on the following circuit to nab second, and the lead duo began to distance itself from the rest of the field.

As Nutter pressed Hurst lap after lap, Gamblin and Arnie Prater had their own battle going for the third spot. First testing Gamblin on lap 13, Prater found a way around the Kokomo veteran on the 14th circuit. Meanwhile, Ryan Hines was on a tear to the front after starting 12th. The Kokomo driver passed Wines for fifth on lap 14, and began gaining on the fourth-place Gamblin immediately.

By lap 15 Nutter had drawn up to the rear bumper of Hurst, and nearly found the lead at the line. The next time around, Nutter was indeed the leader after passing for the top spot on the high side. Hurst remained within shouting distance, however, as the 20-lap event drew to a close.

With just one lap remaining, the two-battle theme resumed as Hurst mounted one last charge at the lead with the help of lapped traffic; at the same time, Hines was hounding Gamblin for the show position. After briefly losing the lead to Hurst on the final lap’s backstretch, Nutter found enough speed on the high side to nip Hurst at the stripe for the win.

Hines was able to circle Gamblin on the final circuit to take third in front of Gamblin, Andre Missig, Wines, Ramseyer and Greg Pitts.

In the thunder car A-main, Tony Bowman continued his dominance of the division by recording his sixth consecutive victory.

Starting from outside the third row, Bowman shot into third place on the opening circuit behind Jeff Shaw and Jason Larrison. By lap two Bowman was already in front, having used a backstretch maneuver to get around the leaders.

From there it was all Bowman, all the time. Stretching out his lead to nearly a straightaway at times, Bowman was the class of the field yet again. Behind him, Larrison overtook the second spot when Shaw dropped from contention on lap nine, and Chris Clark vaulted into the third position despite a malfunctioning hood.

Late in the event, Tim Huffman passed Allen Davis to snare the fourth spot, a position he would not give up. Larrison placed second and was followed by Clark, Huffman, Davis and Gerald Armfield.